Wednesday, 25 September 2013

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes Biography

Source (Google.com.pk)
Born in London, England, on October 31, 1795, John Keats devoted his short life to the perfection of poetry marked by vivid imagery, great sensuous appeal and an attempt to express a philosophy through classical legend. In 1818 he went on a walking tour in the Lake District. His exposure and overexertion on that trip brought on the first symptoms of the tuberculosis, which ended his life.

CONTENTS

Synopsis
Early Years
Early Poetry
Recovering Poet
The Mature Poet
Final Years
QUOTES

"If Poetry comes not as naturally as Leaves to a tree it had better not come at all."

– John Keats
Early Years

A revered English poet whose short life spanned just 25 years, John Keats was born October 31, 1795, in London, England. He was the oldest of Thomas and Frances Keats’ four children. 

Keats lost his parents at an early age. He was eight years old when his father, a livery stable-keeper, was killed after being trampled by a horse.

His father's death had a profound effect on the young boy's life. In a more abstract sense, it shaped Keats' understanding for the human condition, both its suffering and its loss. This tragedy and others helped ground Keats' later poetry—one that found its beauty and grandeur from the human experience.  

In a more mundane sense, Keats' father's death greatly disrupted the family's financial security. His mother, Frances, seemed to have launched a series of missteps and mistakes after her husband’s death; she quickly remarried and just as quickly lost a good portion of the family's wealth. After her second marriage fell apart, Frances left the family, leaving her children in the care of her mother. 

She eventually returned to her children's life, but her life was in tatters. In early 1810, she died of tuberculosis. 

During this period, Keats found solace and comfort in art and literature. At Enfield Academy, where he started shortly before his father's passing, Keats proved to be a voracious reader. He also became close to the school's headmaster, John Clarke, who served as a sort of a father figure to the orphaned student and encouraged Keats' interest in literature.

Back home, Keats' maternal grandmother turned over control of the family's finances, which was considerable at the time, to a London merchant named Richard Abbey. Overzealous in protecting the family's money, Abbey showed himself to be reluctant to let the Keats children spend much of it. He refused to be forthcoming about how much money the family actually had and in some cases was downright deceitful. 

There is some debate as to whose decision it was to pull Keats out of Enfield, but in the fall of 1810, Keats left the school for studies to become a surgeon. He eventually studied medicine at a London hospital and became a licensed apothecary in 1816.

Early Poetry

But Keats' career in medicine never truly took off. Even as he studied medicine, Keats’ devotion to literature and the arts never ceased. Through his friend, Cowden Clarke, whose father was the headmaster at Enfield, Keats met publisher, Leigh Hunt of The Examiner.

Hunt's radicalism and biting pen had landed him in prison in 1813 for libeling Prince Regent.

Quick: picture a poet. Who do you see? Is it a moody, sensitive guy, wandering around a moor or a field or a forest? Congratulations! You have just conjured to mind a Romantic poet. Many of the stereotypes that we have about poets and poetry originated in this period in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Artists disillusioned with industrialization and urbanization turned to nature for inspiration, valuing emotion over reason and feeling over rationality. They sought the awesome, divine beauty that could only be experienced in the tranquility of nature and only by one willing to be quiet long enough to feel it.

No one can say precisely what started the Romantic era, but its breakthrough in English literature was a 1798 volume of poetry entitled Lyrical Ballads, by William Wordsworth. (Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge actually wrote some of the poetry as well, but more on that later.) Wordsworth's preface to a later edition of Lyrical Ballads essentially became the manifesto of literary English Romanticism. The poems, he promised the reader, were free of "gaudiness and inane phraseology of many modern writers." Their goal, instead, "was to choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them …in a selection of language really used by men, and, at the same time, to throw over them a certain colouring of imagination, … and, further, and above all, to make these incidents and situations interesting by tracing in them, truly though not ostentatiously, the primary laws of our nature."2

William Wordsworth is a quintessential Romantic poet. He lived not in smoky, crowded London but in the rugged beauty of England's Lake District. His poems were mentally composed during long walks outdoors. He sympathized with the poor and oppressed. He romanticized peasants and children, whom he believed capable of perceiving the divine more purely than those corrupted by city living. From his childhood, he was a remarkably intense figure. And as an adult, he believed above all else that "all good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings."3 Put passion together with plain language and meter, Wordsworth decreed, and you've got quality poetry.


Wordsworth warned readers of Lyrical Ballads that they would either love or hate the poetry, and the same seems to have been true of the poet himself. Wordsworth was, by all accounts, humorless and egotistical. He believed that he was a genius and liked to hang out with people who agreed with him on this point. He was so cheap that he charged tourists who visited him for tea. Despite his shortcomings, he was fortunate enough to have close companions like his sister Dorothy and friend Samuel Taylor Coleridge who were willing to sacrifice their own careers in order to advance his. Because of their efforts, and because of Wordsworth's undeniable talent and drive, we have today a beautiful body of work that speaks straight to the soul.

She eventually returned to her children's life, but her life was in tatters. In early 1810, she died of tuberculosis. 

During this period, Keats found solace and comfort in art and literature. At Enfield Academy, where he started shortly before his father's passing, Keats proved to be a voracious reader. He also became close to the school's headmaster, John Clarke, who served as a sort of a father figure to the orphaned student and encouraged Keats' interest in literature.

Back home, Keats' maternal grandmother turned over control of the family's finances, which was considerable at the time, to a London merchant named Richard Abbey. Overzealous in protecting the family's money, Abbey showed himself to be reluctant to let the Keats children spend much of it. He refused to be forthcoming about how much money the family actually had and in some cases was downright deceitful. 

There is some debate as to whose decision it was to pull Keats out of Enfield, but in the fall of 1810, Keats left the school for studies to become a surgeon. He eventually studied medicine at a London hospital and became a licensed apothecary in 1816.

Early Poetry

But Keats' career in medicine never truly took off. Even as he studied medicine, Keats’ devotion to literature and the arts never ceased. Through his friend, Cowden Clarke, whose father was the headmaster at Enfield, Keats met publisher, Leigh Hunt of The Examiner.

Hunt's radicalism and biting pen had landed him in prison in 1813 for libeling Prince Regent.

Quick: picture a poet. Who do you see? Is it a moody, sensitive guy, wandering around a moor or a field or a forest? Congratulations! You have just conjured to mind a Romantic poet. Many of the stereotypes that we have about poets and poetry originated in this period in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Artists disillusioned with industrialization and urbanization turned to nature for inspiration, valuing emotion over reason and feeling over rationality. They sought the awesome, divine beauty that could only be experienced in the tranquility of nature and only by one willing to be quiet long enough to feel it.

No one can say precisely what started the Romantic era, but its breakthrough in English literature was a 1798 volume of poetry entitled Lyrical Ballads, by William Wordsworth. (Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge actually wrote some of the poetry as well, but more on that later.) Wordsworth's preface to a later edition of Lyrical Ballads essentially became the manifesto of literary English Romanticism. The poems, he promised the reader, were free of "gaudiness and inane phraseology of many modern writers." Their goal, instead, "was to choose incidents and situations from common life, and to relate or describe them …in a selection of language really used by men, and, at the same time, to throw over them a certain colouring of imagination, … and, further, and above all, to make these incidents and situations interesting by tracing in them, truly though not ostentatiously, the primary laws of our nature."2

William Wordsworth is a quintessential Romantic poet. He lived not in smoky, crowded London but in the rugged beauty of England's Lake District. His poems were mentally composed during long walks outdoors. He sympathized with the poor and oppressed. He romanticized peasants and children, whom he believed capable of perceiving the divine more purely than those corrupted by city living. From his childhood, he was a remarkably intense figure. And as an adult, he believed above all else that "all good poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings."3 Put passion together with plain language and meter, Wordsworth decreed, and you've got quality poetry.


Wordsworth warned readers of Lyrical Ballads that they would either love or hate the poetry, and the same seems to have been true of the poet himself. Wordsworth was, by all accounts, humorless and egotistical. He believed that he was a genius and liked to hang out with people who agreed with him on this point. He was so cheap that he charged tourists who visited him for tea. Despite his shortcomings, he was fortunate enough to have close companions like his sister Dorothy and friend Samuel Taylor Coleridge who were willing to sacrifice their own careers in order to advance his. Because of their efforts, and because of Wordsworth's undeniable talent and drive, we have today a beautiful body of work that speaks straight to the soul.

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Lyrics Quotes For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

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