Thursday, 26 September 2013

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems Biography

Source (Google.com.pk)
In spite of difference of soil and climate, of language and manners, of laws and customs, in spite of things silently gone out of mind and things violently destroyed, the Poet binds together by passion and knowledge the vast empire of human society, as it is spread over the whole earth, and over all time. The objects of the Poet's thoughts are every where; though the eyes and senses of man are, it is true, his favorite guides, yet he will follow wheresoever he can find an atmosphere of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge--it is as immortal as the heart of man."
--William Wordsworth, "Preface to Lyrical Ballads"
Romanticism was arguably the largest artistic movement of the late 1700s. Its influence was felt across continents and through every artistic discipline into the mid-nineteenth century, and many of its values and beliefs can still be seen in contemporary poetry.

It is difficult to pinpoint the exact start of the Romantic movement, as its beginnings can be traced to many events of the time: a surge of interest in folklore in the mid- to late-eighteenth century with the work of the brothers Grimm, reactions against neoclassicism and the Augustan poets in England, and political events and uprisings that fostered nationalistic pride.

Romantic poets cultivated individualism, reverence for the natural world, idealism, physical and emotional passion, and an interest in the mystic and supernatural. Romantics set themselves in opposition to the order and rationality of classical and neoclassical artistic precepts to embrace freedom and revolution in their art and politics. German romantic poets included Fredrich Schiller and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and British poets such as William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, George Gordon Lord Byron, and John Keats propelled the English Romantic movement. Victor Hugo was a noted French Romantic poet as well, and romanticism crossed the Atlantic through the work of American poets like Walt Whitman and Edgar Allan Poe. The Romantic era produced many of the stereotypes of poets and poetry that exist to this day (i.e., the poet as a highly tortured and melancholy visionary).

Romantic ideals never specifically died out in poetry, but were largely absorbed into the precepts of many other movements. Traces of romanticism lived on in French symbolism and surrealism and in the work of prominent poets such as Charles Baudelaire and Rainer Maria Rilke.

Their poetry was dependent on various features peculiar to their time: a reaction against previous literary styles, arguments with eighteenth century and earlier philosophers, the decline in formal Anglican worship and the rise of dissenting religious sects, and the rapid and unprecedented industrialization of Britain and consequent changes in its countryside.

Above all, however, it was the impact of the French Revolution which gave the period its most distinctive and urgent concerns. Following the Revolution itself, which began in 1789, Britain was at war with France on continental Europe for nearly twenty years while massive repression of political dissent was implemented at home. Against this background much of the major writing of the period, associated with the term Romantic, takes place between 1789 (when the French Revolution began) and 1824 (the death of Byron) and can be seen as a response to changing political and social conditions in one respect or another.

This is a collection of British poetry written during the years 1793 through 1815. Its special significance lies in the fact that its theme is war and war was, if we take the mass of poetry of the period into account, perhaps the principal poetic subject in an age in which society was being restructured in terms of the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, industrialization. The three hundred and fifty poems presented here, selected from more than three thousand poems collected from contemporary publications, are representative of the massive number of war poems which were then widely circulated, but which have not been previously collected, or edited, or, with some exceptions, reprinted. They have been selected to illustrate not only the attitudes of the poets toward the war, which is of importance to a full understanding of the historical background of Romanticism, but they also trace in a broad, popular spectrum the development of the poetic styles of Romanticism. Their continuity of subject matter is especially useful in revealing this development.

Romance is the language of love. It is the way that you show your partner that you care about them. Every person has their own idea of what they might consider romantic. For some it will be dressing up for the other or buying flowers or jewelry. There is no way to know what is romantic without knowing the person. Romance is created by the feeling that you are genuinely cared about. All romance has one thing in common; it must show the other person that you care enough to find out what is meaningful to them.

It is to Emerson I have turned now,   
damp February, for he has written   
of the moral harmony of nature.   
The key to every man is his thought.   
But Emerson, half angel, suffers his   
dear Ellen’s dying only half-consoled
that her lungs shall no more be torn nor her

head scalded by her blood, nor her whole life   
suffer from the warfare between the force   
& delicacy of her soul & the
weakness of her frame . . . March the 29th,   
1832, of an evening strange
with dreaming, he scribbles, I visited
Ellen’s tomb & opened the coffin.

—Emerson looking in, clutching his key.   
Months of hard freeze have ruptured the wild   
fields of Ohio, and burdock is standing   
as if stunned by persistent cold wind   
or leaning over, as from rough breath.   
I have brought my little one, bundled and   
gloved, to the lonely place to let her run,

hoary whiskers, wild fescue, cracks widened   
along the ground hard from a winter drought.   
I have come out for the first time in weeks   
still full of fever, insomnia-fogged,
to track her flags of breath where she’s dying   
to vanish on the hillsides of bramble
and burr. The seasonal birds—scruff cardinal,

one or two sparrows, something with yellow—
scatter in small explosions of ice.
Emerson, gentle mourner, would be pleased   
by the physical crunch of the ground, damp   
from the melt, shaped by the shape of his boot,   
that half of him who loved the Dunscore heath   
too rocky to cultivate, covered thick

with heather, gnarled hawthorn, the yellow furze
not far from Carlyle’s homestead where they strolled,
—that half of him for whom nature was thought.   
Kate has found things to deepen her horror   
for evenings to come, a deer carcass tunneled   
by slugs, drilled, and abandoned, a bundle   
of bone shards, hoof and hide, hidden by thick

bramble, or the bramble itself enough
to collapse her dreams, braided like rope, blood-
colored, blood-barbed, tangled as Medusa.
What does she see when she looks at such things?   
I do not know what is so wrong with me
that my body has erupted, system
by system, sick unto itself. I do

not know what I have done, nor what she thinks   
when she turns toward her ill father. How did   
Emerson behold of his Ellen, un-
embalmed face fallen in, of her white hands?   
Dreams & beasts are two keys by which we are   
to find out the secrets of our own natures.   
Half angel, Emerson wrestles all night

with his journal, the awful natural
fact of Ellen’s death, which must have been
deeper sacrifice than a sacrament.
Where has she gone now, whose laughter comes down   
like light snow on the beautiful hills?   
Perhaps it is the world that is the matter . . .

—His other half worried by the wording.

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

Romantic Poems For Her For Him For Girlfriend And Sayings Tumblr For Him Form The Heart For Her Form The Heart

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